Communications » Summer Info. & Announcements

Summer Info. & Announcements

Supply List 2019-2020

Summer Reading List 2019-2020
 
Rising Sixth Graders ~ Select one of the following books to read:
      • Fiction
        • Ghost by Jason Reynolds (Lexile level: 730)
        • Paper Things by Jennifer Richard Jacobson (Lexile level: 830)
      • Nonfiction
        • The Making of America: Alexander Hamilton by Teri Kanefield (Lexile level: 1170)
 
During the third week of school, there will be an in-class assessment for the novels in which students will answer open-response questions that require them to cite evidence from the novel.
 
Rising Seventh Graders ~ Select one of the following books to read:
      • Rising Honors Students:
        • I am Malala by Malala Yousafzai (Lexile Level: 1000)
        • Refugee by Alan Gratz (Lexile Level: 800)
      • Rising Standard Students:
        • My Name is Parvana by Deborah Ellis (Lexile: 670)
        • A Long Walk to Water by Linda Sue Park (Lexile: 720)
        • Esperanza Rising by Pam Munoz Ryan (Lexile: 750)
 
During the third week of school, students will submit an Approach Paper to demonstrate their knowledge of the book. *see "Writing an Approach Paper Instructions" below.
 
Rising Eighth Graders ~ Select one of the following books to read.
      • House of the Scorpion by Nancy Farmer (Lexile: 660)
      • Unbroken by Lauren Hillenbrand (Lexile: 1010)
 
During the third week of school, there will be an in-class assessment for the novels in which students will answer open-response questions that require them to cite evidence from the novel.

Writing an Approach Paper Instructions

Writing an Approach Paper
An approach paper consists of several sections:
  • I. Proper heading with your name, date, class, and novel title
  • II. Summary Paragraph: A three or four sentence paragraph which explains the ENTIRE novel using as much description and detail as you can manage. This is often the most difficult section of the approach paper to write. It will take some time to condense the happenings of the novel into these few sentences which all start in a different way.
  • III. Character Descriptions: Choose three or four main characters in your novel or play. By each of these character’s name, list four or five words which describe the character distinctly. This is a good time to think about vivid vocabulary words and to check the dictionary and thesaurus for ideas. If you use a particular word to describe one character, you may not use that same word to describe another character.
  • IV. Discussion/Essay Questions: Write three questions that a teacher might ask you about the novel or play either in class or for an essay. These questions should be thought-provoking and almost always take more than one line to type because they ask readers to combine more than one idea. Just writing these types of questions helps you to anticipate what questions might be asked of you in class discussion or on a test and encourages you to think more insightfully about the book or play.
  • V. Key Passage: Choose the most important passage in the novel (in your opinion). Type it up word-for-word in the approach paper. Make sure to identify the Speakers.
  • VI. Key Passage Explanation: In a fully-developed paragraph, explain why your chosen passage is important to understanding the novel. In your explanation, make sure you integrate quotes (actual words or phrases) from the key passage to strengthen your explanation. Often, this selected passage will offer clues to the novel’s themes. Explain any mentioned or inferred themes connected to the key passage.
Save the Date | Wildcat Camp
 
Learn about your new school and all things Crestdale!
 
  • Rising 6th Graders
  • Tuesday, August 6
  • 8:30AM - 12PM